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There are many types of custodial interference

Once a child custody agreement is in place, both parents should follow the plan down to every last detail. While this is not always possible, any deviation should be discussed with the other parent to ensure that he or she is okay with it.

Unfortunately, there are many types of custodial interference, with some much more serious than others. Some of the most common examples include:

-- Limiting a child's communication with the other parent, such as by prohibiting phone calls.

-- Refusing to give the child to the other parent for scheduled visitation.

-- Purposefully failing to hand off the child at the right time.

-- Visiting with the child when he or she is supposed to be spending time with the other parent.

All of these situations can be extremely stressful. If you find yourself stressed out because of custodial interference, it is safe to assume that your child feels the same way. In this case, it is a good idea to discuss the issue with the other parent. If that doesn't work, it may be time to head back to court to straighten things out.

As a parent, you need to do what is best for your child. This means avoiding situations in which an instance of custodial interference could turn into something much more serious.

If you are faced with custodial interference or if you are worried about what to do next, you don't have to sit around and hope that things change. You should tell the other parent that you have a problem, and then work it out to avoid a more serious concern in the future.

Source: FindLaw, "Custody Problems," accessed May 24, 2016

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