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Annulments: When they can be used

Marriages don't always last, and some aren't even legal in Florida. For example, you can't marry a first cousin, sister or brother, your mother or your father, just to name a few. In Florida, annulment is a possibility in some cases when you no longer want to stay married or have married illegally. There are several ways to end your marriage, from legal separation to divorce, so deciding on the best one for your situation is important.

Is annulment good for those who have mental disabilities?

Annulment can be a good choice if you can prove that one of the people in the marriage was unable to consent due to mental incapacity. This means one of the members of the couple didn't understand what marriage was or what it would mean to them.

What about getting married when you're under the influence?

Another reason for an annulment would be if you got married when you were drunk or under the influence of drugs. Marriages are not recognized when either person was intoxicated and unable to consent.

Minors can marry with consent, but what if they get married without it?

If one of the spouses is underage and did not have parental consent, this can lead to an annulment. This prevents teens who are underage from running off and eloping or being forced into marriages without parental consent.

What if you've been lied to about the kind of marriage you're in?

Finally, annulments are possible if one spouse misrepresents him or herself or something about the marriage to get the other spouse to consent. If you can prove fraud was used to get you to marry someone, an annulment may be an option.

Source: FindLaw, "Florida Annulment and Prohibited Marriage Laws," accessed Aug. 24, 2016

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