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Does Florida have laws restricting who can get married?

In Florida, there are age requirements that you must meet if you want to get married. For example, the minimum legal age for any person to get married is 16. If you are 16 and want to get married, both you and your partner must have parental consent to do so. Parental consent isn't always required, though, in special circumstances. For instance, if your parents have passed away, you will not need consent.

A judge may determine if you are too young to have the marriage license issued. If you are pregnant and under the age of 18, you may also be issued a marriage license by a judge if he or she deems it appropriate. If you were previously married before the age of 18 and want to get married again, you are able to by law without parental consent.

Once you turn 18, you no longer need any parental consent to get married. There are a few other requirements, though. For instance, you must have a photo ID and Social Security card, I-94 card or passport. If you recently had a divorce, you need to have a copy of the divorce decree if it occurred within the last 30 days.

Before you get married in Florida, you are required to go to a four-hour marriage preparation course. If you don't want to take this course, you can avoid it by waiting three days from the time you submit your application before you pick up your marriage license. Those who choose to go through the preparation course may be able to get a discount on the filing fee for the license. Your attorney can help make sure you get to take advantage of all the benefits of getting married regardless of your age.

Source: FindLaw, "Florida Marriage Age Requirements Laws," accessed Jan. 19, 2017

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