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3 commonly overlooked issues in child custody disputes

Child custody disputes are some of the most difficult legal situations to arise from divorce proceedings. Of course, you want what is best for your child, but there may be significant disparities between your definition of this and your ex's. If you have found yourself in this situation, there are some things you should keep in mind to find the most productive solution for your family.

There are several issues the courts commonly overlook, too, which you should consider in your custody negotiations. Do not make the mistake of assembling a standard custody agreement and assuming it is sufficient. Pay attention, rather, to the following factors that may affect your case. 

Duration and terms of child support

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, eligibility for child support lasts until a child reaches the age of 18 or if the child is still dependent and in high school, 19. When you are negotiating custody, child support may take a backseat, but it is an equally important issue. If you are the custodial parent until your child reaches this age, you should ensure you receive the support you need.

Collaborative parenting plans

Too often, custody battles turn into a fight that one parent must win at any cost. Though you surely have your differences with your ex, you should never allow these issues to compromise your child's wellbeing. Rather than taking an adversarial stance, consider collaborative parenting plans. Many parents overlook this option, but it may be the best one for maintaining normalcy for your child.

Options for flexible visitation and custody

Custody is never one-size-fits-all. Every family has different needs, and yours may necessitate an arrangement that is more flexible than the typical custody arrangement. There are, in fact, many ways to create a custody plan that works for you, your ex and your children. Enlisting help from a legal representative can help you negotiate the custody, child support and parenting arrangement you want.

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