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Child custody matters and your case: Get the final say

Child custody laws don't typically vary much between states. That's because most states comply with the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act. This act has various laws that state how child custody decisions have to be made and about whether or not visitation rights should be granted to a parent. Additionally, the act discusses how joint custody works if parents agree to it.

Florida adopted this act in 1977. It does allow parents to agree to joint custody as an option, allowing both parents equitable time with their children. Florida is one of the states that does recognize the rights of grandparents and their potential right to visitation with their grandchild or grandchildren.

In the case that a child has his or her own opinion on where he or she wants to live, the court does take those wishes into consideration. Your child does not get the final say in custody arrangements, since the court looks at many factors before deciding on custody rights and schedules.

There is a chance that the court won't have much of a say in your custody agreement if you and your spouse can work together to come up with an amicable solution. If you can't, then it's more likely that the court will hear each side's preferences and arguments before making a decision in the best interests of your child.

Our website has more on child custody and child support, so you can educate yourself on this important matter. If you're confused about what to do next, you may find what you're looking for there.

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