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These jobs make divorce more likely across the United States

Divorces are common across America, but there are a few jobs that make it more likely than others. If you knew that your job would make it more likely to get a divorce, would you keep it? You might if you love it, even though it could ruin your love life.

What kinds of jobs hurt your relationships the most? It seems to be those that put a distance between partners or that create uncertainty in the relationship. For example, bartenders are more likely to get a divorce, and bartenders may have a fluctuating income that impacts a marriage. Flight attendants have a divorce rate of over 50 percent, and they are often at work, flying hundreds or thousands of miles away from their homes and families. Those in production jobs also have divorce rates over 50 percent.

Interestingly, stress itself isn't necessarily a cause of divorce. Doctors and scientists, both in highly stressful fields, have lower rates of divorce. That could be due to the fact that higher salaries are linked to a lower rate of divorce. Anyone in a middle-income level has an average chance of divorce comparably. That could indicate that income has a much higher impact on the rate of divorce than the job itself, though the jobs may have some impact based on the needs of the relationship. Culturally, divorces are less common among Asians in the United States, while those who do not have a job are at a higher risk of divorce.

If you're ready to seek a divorce, you're not alone. People go through divorces every day. You can seek custody and make sure you get your fair share of your assets if you plan and negotiate well.

Source: Metro, "If you want a long, happy marriage, don't marry someone who does this as a job," Kimberly M. Aquilina, July 31, 2017

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