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Working together to resolve custody disputes is the best way

Your child's health and happiness is your primary concern, which is why it bothers you that your child's other parent always causes a struggle when you're trying to arrange visitation or custody plans. It's possible to work together to resolve custody issues, but it does require that both parents pay attention to the wants and needs of their child as well as their own schedules.

One way to work through custody issues is to go through alternative dispute resolution (ADR) proceedings. ADR could include mediation or arbitration, for instance. With mediation, you and your ex-partner come together with a third party to discuss your custody concerns and ideas on how you want to set up your custody arrangements. Since there is a third party there, it's easier to stick to the topic and avoid rambling, blaming the other person or going off on a tangent. The mediator is helpful, because he or she is versed in law and can help you understand the impact of your decisions.

Arbitration can be binding or not, depending on your preference. Arbitration is more structured, and instead of you coming up with a solution together, a third party makes a determination after hearing what both parents have to say and looking at the evidence. In a binding hearing, the result is legally binding and sets your custody arrangements in stone.

Your attorney can talk to you about either of these options or others you may want to try. You don't have to delay your divorce due to being unable to work together. There are solutions that can move your case along.

Source: FindLaw, "Working Together to Resolve Custody," accessed Sep. 28, 2017

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