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3 things to consider before moving out of the marital home

When you and your spouse decide to break up, it may be difficult to live in the same home. Residing in the marital house together may cause some emotional turmoil. You may be considering leaving the marital home as soon as you can.

However, leaving the family home can significantly impact how your divorce unfolds. Before you pack up your bags and go, you should take some things into consideration.

1. Comfort and safety

Of course, if there is any type of domestic violence in your home, the most important thing for you is to stay safe. You may need to file a protective restraining order if you are at risk of getting hurt by an abusive spouse. Leaving the marital home may be the best thing for you to do in this type of situation, especially if you have children. However, make sure you talk to an attorney about any type of court order for protection or temporary custody before you leave.

2. Financial security

Moving out may influence your finances in ways you do not expect. For example, if you are the breadwinner of your household and you find your own place while your divorce is pending, you may get stuck with a spousal support order on top of your new living expenses. Continuing to live together for the time being may help you save some money. 

3. Child custody

If there are children in the picture, you should seriously reconsider your desire to move out. According to Forbes, leaving the family home may negatively impact the outcome of a custody dispute. If the other parent stays in the home with the children, he or she may have an advantage in custody arguments. You may also get stuck with paying more child support.

Whether you move out of the marital house depends on a variety of factors. Think about these things and talk to a lawyer before making a rushed decision.

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