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Marriage failures: Why they don't last

Marriages fail for any number of reasons, but there are some that people just don't talk about. The University of Maryland has found that you have around a 50 percent chance of getting a divorce once you're married. The reasons for these divorces aren't all the same, but for some, they're problems that are often overlooked. Catching them early on could help some save their marriages.

One of the first problems that can lead to divorce is fighting over little things. Avoiding a conflict is important in some ways, but you do need to develop a way to express your emotions. For most, finding a path of communication that works for them leads to a lasting relationship. If you can't seem to connect, divorce is more likely in your future.

Another issue that comes up in some marriages is a lack of eye contact. More or less, individuals feel that they're not loved or aren't being paid attention to enough by their partners. The easy solution is to take time for your loved one and to make sure he or she feels your appreciation and love.

Not being intimate is an issue you may have come across, and it can end an otherwise great marriage. Communication needs to revolve around your relationship as a couple just as much as it should involve your chores, kids and other responsibilities. If you are starting to feel like roommates, it's time to start putting effort into learning about each other again. Having a conversation about each other's days will help you reignite a lost spark.

For some, divorce is the right choice. If that's the case for you, it's a wise choice to look into your legal rights and obligations.

Source: Sunshine State News, "7 Surprising Reasons Marriages Fail That No One Talks About," Karen Cicero, accessed April 06, 2018

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