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4 important factors in child custody cases

Florida's courts have a large amount of discretion when it comes to custody cases in Florida, which can be good or bad depending on the circumstances. There are many factors to consider in every case, including things like making sure the parents are of good moral standing and mentally healthy.

While there are dozens of factors a court may consider, there are some that you should know about now. Think them through, because they could come up when you're having a custody hearing in the future.

1. Your child's home history

Is there a record of violence? Has your child always been with one parent more than the other? These kinds of facts matter in a custody case.

2. Your child's preference

When your child gets older, the court may listen to what they have to say about custody arrangements. Their preferences, along with the way they interact with their parents, matter.

3. The reasonableness of the parents

Can you and your ex get along? Are you both reasonable when it comes to your child? The court has to consider these factors when deciding on your custody arrangement. The court also wants to know if you're encouraging contact with the other parent and being reasonable about changes that have to be made because of illness, work conflicts and other issues.

4. The ability to provide

Finally, there is the need to show that you can provide for your child. The court needs to know that the child's going to the home where they'll receive the best care and support in the future.

These are just a few factors that play a role in child custody cases. Your attorney can talk to you about many others and help you prepare.

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