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Who can receive alimony payments?

If you have a traditional family in which one spouse earns the majority of the money, and the other spouse takes care of the house, children and home, the prospect of getting a divorce could be terrifying. What will happen to you after you leave the individual who is the so-called "breadwinner" of the family? Fortunately, if you've been married for a reasonable amount of time, you might be able to receive alimony payments from your soon-to-be ex.

Spousal support, also known as alimony, is usually temporary and meant to provide a means of financial support – or an economic bridge – to help you become financially independent. You may receive a set amount of money each month to help pay for your living expenses and required education that will assist you in finding an independent job.

Not all spouses will be able to receive alimony, but here are a few signs that you could qualify for these helpful payments:

  • You and your spouse have been married for a number of years. The longer you've been married, the more likely you will receive spousal support.
  • You are currently unemployed, or you are employed in a job that pays substantially less than your spouse's income.
  • You and your spouse enjoyed a quality of life that you can't sustain on your own.
  • At this time, you are lacking in skills and education that would allow you to obtain a job or a better paying job.

If you answered yes to the above questions, it could be a sign that you're an excellent candidate to receive alimony payments. Make sure you discuss this possibility with your divorce attorney who can review your case to determine if a claim for alimony is appropriate in your case.

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