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Do you need an attorney for an uncontested divorce?

You and your spouse always agreed that if you divorced, you wouldn't be horrible to one another. You've both kept your word and are separating peacefully. You know you can get an attorney, but it doesn't seem necessary.

Should you still work with an attorney? What kind of divorce do you need, and does it require working with a legal professional? Here are a few things to know.

What is an uncontested divorce?

An uncontested divorce is one in which you agree on everything with your spouse. You may decide that you can agree on child custody arrangements, asset division or other factors in your divorce. If so, an uncontested divorce is the right decision for you. Every state has its own parameters for what can or cannot be an uncontested divorce, so it's wise to contact an attorney to be sure.

Why is an uncontested divorce good?

It saves you money. It also saves you time, because it's easy to streamline the divorce process. Since you and your spouse can work together, there's little issue with delivering papers (serving the divorce) or having them returned to the court in a timely manner. Additionally, the judge is likely to agree with parties who already have made decisions regarding property division unless the judge feels they are extremely unfair to one party or the other.

Your divorce is likely to be granted more quickly if you have an uncontested divorce. Since that is the case, you'll also have lower legal bills overall.

Do you need to work with an attorney if you have an uncontested divorce?

While an uncontested divorce is simpler than a contested divorce, it's still a good idea to work with an attorney. Your attorney can help you make sure you file the correct documents with the court and legally end your marriage properly.

Source: FindLaw, "Uncontested Divorce," accessed July 04, 2017

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