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Sleep study shows couples separating due to poor sleep

For the second night in a row, you've left the bedroom to sleep somewhere else. Your spouse is hard to sleep with, and you're tired of not getting enough sleep of your own. Sometimes, couples have trouble in their lives because they simply can't get enough sleep. Trying to sleep together may result in rough nights and difficult days. This lack of sleep may also lead to problems in their marriages and eventual divorce.

Interestingly, a survey in Florida has suggested that up to 39.1 percent of people in the state want a "sleep divorce." Essentially, these couples no longer want to share a bed at night.

Is it a realistic goal for people who are in a marriage? Approximately 40 percent of those polled said they wouldn't want to admit to sleeping apart. Still, 10.8 percent admitted that they had ended relationships over the difficulties involved in sleeping in the same bed. Over a fifth of those interviewed admitted to fighting over sleep habits.

Right now, sleeping together with your partner is a social norm. However, a quarter of those surveyed said sleeping apart actually improved their relationships. It's worth a shot if you think your relationship is suffering because you aren't getting enough sleep.

Many people have a multitude of reasons why they believe that their relationships aren't working for them. If you're someone who is ready to separate or file for divorce, don't feel alone. There are hundreds of people making the same decision right along with you. Everyone deserves to have a chance at happiness, and if you aren't happy with your current relationship, a divorce may be the right answer to get you back into a situation you enjoy.

Source: NBC 2, "Survey finds 39.1 percent of Florida couples want a 'Sleep Divorce'," March 21, 2018

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