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Can the birds teach us about parenting after divorce?

If you're a parent, then you definitely know about the birds and the bees. And, you probably thought the usefulness of your knowledge ended with making babies. But there's more -- when we consider the birds, at least. The novel concept of "bird's nest" parenting has been an interesting approach to post-divorce co-parenting.

Many parents don't use these arrangements as permanent. If they use them at all, they might choose "bird nesting" for temporary arrangements that ease the transition into post-divorce life, making things a little bit less traumatic on the kids. The bird's nest style of co-parenting involves the children continuing to live in the family residence. The parents are the ones who go back and forth -- from another separate residence -- to the home of the children.

Like passing a torch, one parent is always on duty, but the children don't have to constantly move around. Some family psychologists believe that this style of parenting can help the kid feel more secure. It's definitely an interesting solution if your kids are having a difficult time adjusting emotionally to dividing their time between two homes. Perhaps you should give bird nesting a try as your kids get comfortable with post-divorce life.

This, of course, is not the only "alternative co-parenting method." In fact, the sky is the limit when it comes to the creative solutions parents can find to solve the challenge of making sure the kids get to spend equal time with both parents after a divorce. If you want to explore your different co-parenting options, our law firm is available to discuss your situation with you.

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